The latest state test scores came out recently. Those of us education acronym lovers call it the “SBAC,” which stands for the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium which a multi-state public agency that developed the new, harder, common core-aligned tests. The recent results were from grade 3-8 and grade 11 students who took the test about 6 months ago, in Spring 2017. There aren’t many statewide trends beyond stagnation and persistent achievement gaps. What about Oakland? Here I offer three fast facts, plus three pieces of good news, three bad, and one important caveat.

First, Fast Facts:

  • Citywide, about one-third of students meet or exceed proficiency standards in math and ELA (specifically, 35% in ELA and 28% in Math.) This includes data from all district-run and charter public schools in Oakland.
  • Statewide, 48% of students were proficient in ELA and 38% of students were proficient in Math.
  • Notably, 3rd and 4th graders performed higher on math than other grades, which make sense given that they’re the students who were exposed to Common Core at an early age – promising results for the future!

The Good News:

  • In 13 Oakland schools, 70% of students met or exceed standards in Math, ELA or both – resulting in a top rating (Blue or Tier 5) on SBAC performance. The schools below are listed in order of greatest total differential—who had the highest percentage of students proficient and above in ELA and math, combined, compared to the Oakland school averages (ELA average = 35%, Math = 28%). Special shout-outs for ARISE High who made huge leaps this year (+22% ELA, +15% Math), as did Francophone (+6% ELA, +23% Math)!
  • Slow but steady improvement amongst vulnerable subgroups. Across all Oakland schools citywide, vulnerable subgroups (students with disabilities, English learners, socioeconomically disadvantaged, African-American, Latino) showed gains (although too minor to be considered gap-closing, imho) on average across Oakland schools (0.4% to 1.4% proficiency increase).

    Click on the map to see the top and bottom performing Oakland public schools on the 16-17 SBAC.

  • Oakland is beating the statewide average in growth of % of students proficient/advanced! Though there has been little growth statewide (±0.5%), Oakland experienced minor improvement citywide from the prior year’s scores; the percent of Oakland students who met or exceeded standards in both ELA and Math grew by 3 percentage points from ’15-16.

The Bad News:

  • Compared to the state, Oakland is way overrepresented among the bottom 5% statewide. Oakland has 26 schools in the bottom 5% statewide (representing 21% of 124 Oakland public schools with scores), more than any city other than Los Angeles, which has 31 – which has 10x the number of students compared to Oakland – see this LA Times analysis). This is a big deal because under federal law (ESSA), these are the schools that “have to” be improved.
  • The schools in the bottom 5% of absolute performance generally saw little growth. Of the bottom 15 schools in ELA and Math in 2016 (excluding alternative schools), the new results show little movement (modest gains/losses ±3% for most schools, which would be considered “maintaining” or no improvement) in Math. Only two showed significant growth in ELA. Here is a map of these schools, which are primarily in West and East Oakland.
  • Even for a large urban district, Oakland is in bottom third. Oakland is the 12th largest district in California (with approx. 73% low-income students). With 35% proficiency in ELA and 28% in Math, Oakland is in the bottom third compared to the top 10 largest districts in both Math and ELA (though Oakland improved slightly more than others).

The Caveat:

This is just a preliminary analysis of an imperfect measure. Using SBAC is imperfect in many ways – a long list that many have already opined on. An especially important imperfection from my perspective is that the state does not use the growth of the individual students. They compare this year’s 6th grade class with last year’s 6th grade class, which does not control for factors like incoming student level. We need a different way to gauge individual student growth and determine if it is on par statewide or worsening through the years.

This latest release of SBAC scores scratches the surface. In an upcoming post, we’ll look more closely at DFM (a new acronym! “Distance From Met”) – one of the most powerful tools for measuring student growth in this latest state testing system.

And of course, ultimately, ELA and Math test scores are not enough. We’re excited that OUSD is developing a better way to communicate about the new CA dashboard which includes more measures for a more holistic view of schools (keep an eye out, it’s called Oakland Public School Report Cards!)

Stay tuned for more!