This is the last of our mini blog series on the Fiscal Crisis and Management Assistance Team’s (FCMAT) Fiscal Health Risk Analysis of OUSD, issued in August. So far, we have provided context, summarized seven areas in OUSD “passed” and 8 areas that OUSD “failed.” This blog is about the 4 areas in which FCMAT gave OUSD a “Mixed” grade.

Before we wrap up this series about OUSD’s FCMAT report, we want to acknowledge the pain, frustration, anger and worry that so many people feel in the current situation – and expressed at last night’s board meeting.  All of us who live, work, and raise our families here in Oakland, want our children – all children, no matters their zip code, race, income, immigration status, or country of origin – to have a great public education. And that takes adequate, stable, and wisely-used resources.

Using resources well requires robust and reliable financial systems. Below are four areas in which OUSD has some work to do but that OUSD also has some strengths:

  • Enrollment and Attendance: This area covers how the district forecasts and manages student enrollment, whether it staffs appropriately for the number of students, and how it tracks and boosts student attendance. Average Daily Attendance (ADA) is the basis by which California distributes per pupil revenue, so this is critical. Of the 10 questions, OUSD received a “Yes” (positive) on 6 questions and “No” (negative) on 4 questions, although we saw two important inconsistencies between these answers and the text. The first inconsistency is related to the enrollment trend. FCMAT reports “the district has lost 55 students from 2013-14 to 2016-17” and shows a chart that shows minor enrollment fluctuations around 37,000 students over the past 4 years.[1] But the report also answers “No” to the question “Has the district’s enrollment been increasing or stable?” This fuels the misperception that OUSD enrollment has declined over the past several years, which then could divert attention from the poor decision-making and weak financial systems that produced the current situation. The second inconsistency in the report is related to enrollment tracking. The report describes “cell formula irregularities” in Excel spreadsheets used to project enrollment that “once realized, did not cause management to reduce staffing accordingly.” This seems like a series of serious missteps, but FCMAT didn’t seem to take data quality into account in its answers to questions about enrollment projections and analysis.
  • Cash Monitoring: This section covers how the district manages its cash flow. It’s not enough to have a fund balance on paper; the district also needs cash in the bank to pay bills on time. During the recession, this was hard because the state provided IOUs instead of cash, but the state is now paying districts on time – and yet OUSD “is experiencing cash flow shortages requiring temporary borrowing.” Some of the borrowing is internal, between funds. OUSD has also “borrowed from the county treasurer to meet cash flow needs for general fund operations.” But at least, the district repays inter-fund borrowing as required, and balances its checkbook every month.
  • General Fund: This section looks at whether the district matches the duration of revenue sources with the duration of expenses. Unfortunately, OUSD regularly uses one-time or time-limited funds for ongoing salaries and doesn’t reduce expenses even when revenues might not be available to cover them. The overall rating is mixed because, on the plus side, the percentage of the district’s unrestricted general fund spending on salaries is at or below the statewide average, and no material changes in litigation are anticipated.
  • General Ledger: This section covers some standard accounting practices, like recording financial activity accurately and in a timely manner. Fortunately, FCMAT says the district is heeding these (i.e. “Yes” answers to 4 of 6 questions). OUSD receives a mixed overall rating because the district recorded its beginning balances incorrectly and failed to make some accounting adjustments to reflect actuals inflows and outflows.

Phew. That’s it on the specifics of this important FCMAT report: the good, the bad and the mixed up. To summarize: budget cuts alone will NOT keep us from ending up back here again. To restore fiscal vitality, OUSD must make significant changes to its fiscal management, governance practices, managerial practices, and culture.

So Now What

For those of you who are wondering: “What can I do?” here are a few ideas:

Keep paying attention. Our public school system needs taxpayers and voters to get informed, stay engaged and become active. Don’t blindly concur with simple slogans. The situation is complex and the solutions require real tradeoffs and more critical thinking than a catchy chant can capture. Read more, visit OUSD’s fiscal transparency website, and track OUSD Board discussions and decisions.

Contribute to the Oakland Public Education Fund’s A-Z Fund. Some schools have PTAs that can raise enough money to make up for the cuts; others don’t. This Fund will steer donations towards schools that are serving students with the greatest needs.

Volunteer your time. Many schools still need tutors and classroom assistants. Mid-year budget cuts also mean fewer enrichment programs and fewer field trips. Make up for that gap by finding ways to share your passion – whether its watercolor painting or Afro-Cuban drumming or culinary science – with students. And if you have professional experience working in finance, personnel, or technology, your expertise would be valuable to OUSD’s Board and leaders. (Does OUSD need a Finance Advisory Council?)

A few final thoughts:

We need to get back to focusing on improving educational outcomes for student in our classrooms.  Righting the ship financially is important, but it is the means not the end. Too many Oakland schools are not adequately educating our children, and numerous improvements can still be made on a shoestring budget.

Superintendent Kyla Johnson-Trammell is a leader we all need to support. She inherited this mess, and is taking on the challenge with courage, poise, intelligence, and care – exactly what we would expect from an alumna of Oakland public education.

Oaklanders are tough fighters, creative entrepreneurs, and compassionate citizens. We can use these assets to be part of the solution – and we will all need to work together to support our students through this adversity.

[1] OUSD’s 20 Day Count report showed that enrollment is 302 students higher than the 20 Day Count last school year.

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