I’m so excited about the appointment of a Kyla Johnson-Trammel as the next superintendent; she’s female and attended OUSD schools (like me), and in many ways reflects the community she’s serving. In one of my previous blog posts, we saw how few female superintendents there have been in Oakland over the pasts 50 years (7 of 24- just under 30%), whether selected by our local Board or state-appointed.

Kyla will re-shatter the glass ceiling- sort of: There hasn’t been a locally selected female Superintendent in Oakland in almost two decades, with the last one being Carole Quan (1997-99).

This issue hits really close to home for me as a young female working in a field (data) that is traditionally dominated by males. Here are some interesting points to consider:

The glass ceiling still exists, despite education being an otherwise female-dominated field. From our previous blog post on Superintendents of Oakland in past 50 years, we know that the glass ceiling still exists, and not just in Oakland. Less than one-third of the Superintendents in Alameda County are female in 2015, even though the majority of teachers are female (OUSD teachers = 71% female), making Johnson-Trammell’s appointment that much more important.

Yet women are still paid less on average. Common (and unfortunate) across many sectors: women tend to be paid less than their male counterparts for same position or work. This remains an issue in our own backyard. Across Alameda County, female Superintendents are paid, on average, $29,167 less than male Superintendents in base salary ($250,700 vs $221,533), partially because all larger districts are male-led (again, scoring the importance of Johnson-Trammell’s appointment for the largest school district in Alameda County).

How will Johnson-Trammell’s salary stack against previous male predecessors? Average for past OUSD head honchos (permanent and interim from 2012-15) is $294,776 in total pay ($275,911 in base salary, not adjusted for inflation, though the numbers are all pretty recent); remember, they all have been male. According to the Board report for this Wednesday’s meeting, Superintendent Johnson-Trammell will be paid slightly less than the average: $280,000 in base pay with a little over $20,000 in fringe benefits.

What is considered “fair” compensation for a Superintendent? (Note: we’ll look at total pay, which includes other pay packages and salary but exclude benefits for simplicity and fairness.) Again, some points to consider:

Based on district size: The size of the district matters: it’s easier to manage a district serving 1,000 students than 10,000. All other things being equal, superintendents in bigger districts should be paid more than in smaller districts. OUSD operates or oversees schools serving a total of about 50,000 students. Projecting from other local Superintendent salaries, OUSD’s Superintendent should be paid $323,924 based on size of district.

Based on student demographics: The student population matters because it affects the budget and other factors. Comparing Oakland with Livermore, which serves fewer and more affluent students, might not be a helpful benchmark. So, let’s offer a more “apples-to-apples” view and look at other similar school districts across California that have similar student demographics and size. On average, OUSD compensates Superintendents a little more than these similar districts by $24K in total pay on average ($294,776 vs $270,955).

Student enrollment vs total pay for Superintendents in Alameda County, CA in 2015. Green = male, Yellow = female.

Compensation is a lot more than just base pay: Base salary often receives the most attention, but some Superintendents receive substantial value ($62K!!) in “other pay” that contributes to their total pay. Some of these additional components can be compensating a Superintendent for a smaller base salary; it can also lead to egregious padding for the top guns. (For the curious: John Collins of Poway Unified had $62K in “other pay” in addition to the $309K base salary, bringing his total pay to $371K for a district enrollment of 35K students in 2015.) Benefits are important, too, as they contribute to how much a school district must shell out to employ one person. The range differs in orders of magnitude from $853 to $96,660.

Some might argue that there are other factors that should be considered, including familiar ones like credentials or teaching/managing experience, and some harder-to-evaluate ones like level of complexity. I couldn’t find reliable numbers on these, but if pay were higher for “challenging” situations, given our current budget situation, unsatisfactory school quality, and passionate political debates at school board meetings, Superintendent Johnson Trammell would need to be paid way more that we can afford!

Overall, it appears our new Superintendent will be compensated appropriately – higher than the “salary cap” that some in the community have suggested, but less than what her male predecessor made. We’ll stay tuned in to see exactly how things shake out at the June 14 Board meeting.

For my fellow data nerds, I’ve pulled together some salary info of our county’s Superintendents and superintendents from similar districts as a “starter pack. Salaries of many public employees, including superintendents, from 2011-2015 are available through Transparent California, a public group dedicated to sharing out accurate information on compensation of public employees.

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My name is Carrie Chan, and I’m Educate78’s newest staff member. I joined the organization as an Analyst, and I LOVE data (feel free to call me a data geek). As a former OUSD student, I also care a lot about Oakland public schools. That is why I am so excited about this new blog series, “Crunched!” which will take a data-driven approach to important, relevant questions facing Oakland public schools. Please email me with ideas or requests.

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